Gudgeon Issues

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1 month 2 weeks ago - 1 month 2 weeks ago #3633 by Debi Shaimas
Gudgeon Issues was created by Debi Shaimas
Looking at the Richie Mahoney’s gudgeon picture on the FB group and reading Ted Brewer’s notes I see a few challenges we must address on Serenity:

Challenge 1: The people who last worked on the rudder bent the gudgeon on one side.  I assume we can take our bent piece into a machine shop to have it bent back to proper form.  Will this in any way weaken the metal or cause a future issue?  We are in Central America which means that wherever I take the part to they will say “of course we can bend it” but won’t have a clue as to technical issues, if any.

Challenge 2:  Ted says, in his rudder installation notes, that at the gudgeon “bushing may be required if loose at this point”.
Can I make a bushing using the WestSystem instructions for “Repairing Worn Rudder Bearings”?  (Requires 105 resin/hardener thickened with 50% Colloidal Silica and 50% 423 graphite powder.  I have these all on hand as I just did the rudder bearing at the rudder tube.)

Challenge 3:  In addition to the 4 bronze screws which attach the gudgeon to the hull, there are two bolts which tighten the two halves against each other.  These bolts were lost by the previous repair person.  The threaded side is an odd size 3/8”-24.  
Bronze bolts are available but only with a hex head.  I hesitate to use a different metal, like 316 Stainless next to bronze under water BUT, could I use WestSystem basic faster bonding technique to put a layer of epoxy between the two metals?  I could use wax on the screw to ensure removal in the future and make sure the epoxy that goes on top of the gudgeon at the hull extends out to cover those two bolt ends as well.  Or am I, as my husband always complains, over thinking this third challenge?

Thanks for any input, thoughts, advice.
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Last edit: 1 month 2 weeks ago by Debi Shaimas.

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1 month 2 weeks ago #3634 by DAVID JONES
Replied by DAVID JONES on topic Gudgeon Issues
Challenge 1: The people who last worked on the rudder bent the gudgeon on one side. I assume we can take our bent piece into a machine shop to have it bent back to proper form. Will this in any way weaken the metal or cause a future issue? We are in Central America which means that wherever I take the part to they will say “of course we can bend it” but won’t have a clue as to technical issues, if any.

In my opinion with the small amount of bend I see - I would not be concerned bending this back into shape.

Challenge 2: Ted says, in his rudder installation notes, that at the gudgeon “bushing may be required if loose at this point”.
Can I make a bushing using the WestSystem instructions for “Repairing Worn Rudder Bearings”? (Requires 105 resin/hardener thickened with 50% Colloidal Silica and 50% 423 graphite powder. I have these all on hand as I just did the rudder bearing at the rudder tube.)

I see no problem with this - looks like a good way to do it, especially as you have all that on hand.

Challenge 3: In addition to the 4 bronze screws which attach the gudgeon to the hull, there are two bolts which tighten the two halves against each other. These bolts were lost by the previous repair person. The threaded side is an odd size 3/8”-24.
Bronze bolts are available but only with a hex head. I hesitate to use a different metal, like 316 Stainless next to bronze under water BUT, could I use WestSystem basic faster bonding technique to put a layer of epoxy between the two metals? I could use wax on the screw to ensure removal in the future and make sure the epoxy that goes on top of the gudgeon at the hull extends out to cover those two bolt ends as well. Or am I, as my husband always complains, over thinking this third challenge?

This one is a bit more complicated. I would use bronze not stainless steel. Just a FYI, 316 stainless steel is not rated for submersion use, even though everyone does it. If you can get the 3/8 -24 in bronze, I'd get those and modify the head to what you need. That's a tough size. Not easy to find. This would be my first choice. If you have to use another material, then all the things you are thinking about are actually good things to think about.

dj
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1 month 2 weeks ago #3635 by DAVID JONES
Replied by DAVID JONES on topic Gudgeon Issues
Just a note on modifying the heads of the bronze hex screws. If you take two nuts and run them onto the threaded portion so they lock, you can put that into a drill. Use that set-up to work like a lathe. Use a vise and put the drill in the vise to hold it in place and then use a file while turning the bolt with the drill. With care you can create a flat head screw with bevel out of a hex head. It may take some time, but you've only got two screws to make. Shouldn't really take that long. When cutting the bevel, do be careful to not cut the shank. You may need to make some kind of rest to hold the file more precisely. It doesn't have to be perfect, you can fit it to the side the head goes in. To make the slot, carefully cut with a hack saw.

It depends upon what you have available - but starting with the right threads and a hex head is a great starting point.

dj
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1 month 2 weeks ago #3636 by Steven Lott
Replied by Steven Lott on topic Gudgeon Issues
First. Bronze below the waterline.

If you are forced to use steel, anhydrous lanolin (store.offshorespars.com/products/lanocot...on-inhibitor-4oz-jar) or Tef gel are good electrical isolators. (www.tefgel.com/contain.php?param=tefgel_infor)

I can highly recommend lanocote for anything below the waterline that you might want to unscrew. Anchor hardware in particular.
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